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Posts from the ‘Cuisine by Country’ Category

Dulce de Toronja/Mermelada de Toronja

IMG_4262 Winter may feel endless just now but the season for red pomelos is way too short.  Only a few markets in my neighborhood carry them  and I all but missed them last year.  Sweeter than other varieties with a thick white pitch or albedo, pomelos are perfect for making dulce de toronja and I‘d been waiting all year for them to come back around. Read more

Bori-Bori

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A couple of months ago, I was asked to do a small write up on Felipe Rojas-Lombardi for the launch of the Celebrity Chef stamps series.  I’m embarrassed to say that I didn’t know very much about him when I started.  Though he was famous for his work with James Beard, was the founding chef of Dean & Deluca, and introduced countless Spanish and Latin American food traditions to New York’s culinary scene at his Chelsea restaurant The Ballroom (tapas for a start and quinoa no less), his career predated the chef as celebrity phenomenon and it was sometimes hard to pull up information.  Still when I did find articles, some scanned into pre-Google archives, I found some answers to things I’d always wondered about.  For one, it explained why gourmet prepared food counters (like the one he developed for Dean & Deluca) are essentially Peruvian though they would never fall into the “ethnic” food category (he predated those facile distinctions as well).  Read more

First Look Inside The Cuban Table

CubanTable_ArrozConPollo_Image_72The Cuban Table  will be here next week but I couldn’t wait until then to share a recipe from the book.  I’d been planning on this post for awhile but it was hard to choose just one.  Not only are they all attached to a memory or favorite moment during this long process, they’re also attached to some of my favorite people.  They were great company as I wrote and I’m so excited to introduce them to you.  Even now, I feel like when I open the cover they all start talking once – a familiar feeling if you’ve ever walked into a Cuban gathering.  It’s also at those parties where you’ll most often find … Arroz Con Pollo.  And that’s how I finally decided.  Read more

Crema de Quinoa

IMG_3779When I’m asked how I decided what to post, I always say that one recipe leads to another.  But that’s only half a truth.  More specifically, it comes down to what was left and what I can make of it.  This chowder, for one, started with a recipe for quinoa croquettes.  With the croquettes done and quinoa to spare, I started looking for more ways to use it and came across this recipe in Jose Garces’ Latin Road HomeI was most drawn to the ingredient list featuring staples I always have but never seem to use completely – heavy cream, parsley, the odd potato.  This also meant picking up a few extras quarts of vegetable stock and pulling fresh corn from the dwindling piles at the market.  I followed the recipe as closely as possible the first time around including the fried potatoes, and crumbled bacon.  When it was finished, I realized I had a almost enough left to make a second batch.  I was going into a busy week and knew I’d be rewarming it over a few nights, so I made a vegetarian version.  Also, I was out of bacon.  Instead of using the achiote paste that’s been living in my refrigerator for years with no expiration in site, I used the last of my achiote seeds to make the oil.  The chives became scallions, and I added the cream at the end to finish off the pint.  The one thing I didn’t get to was the fresh  ají costeño pepper sauce Garces suggests, but that will have to wait for the next round.
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Dulce de Grosellas

IMG_3029I don’t remember having currants – red, black, or otherwise – growing up, so I was surprised to find them in one of the older Cuban cookbooks I’d been using, Delicias de las Mesa by Maria Antonieta Reyes Gavalán.   Written in the 1920s, I came across it at the University of Miami’s Cuban Heritage Collection.  While most other Cuban cookbooks date from the mid-fifties when everyone was only too happy to embrace cans and convenience, Gavalán’s book captures an earlier time, referencing ingredients and techniques that had fallen out of use but worth reconsidering. The book itself was so worn and frayed that it couldn’t be scanned or photocopied, so I spent most of  my time in the archives furiously taking notes before reluctantly giving it back. It was complete coincidence when my aunt Marta called from New Orleans to tell me her friend had given her a copy of the book that I could have. Read more

Verdolagas con Costillas de Puerco

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I think my relationship with New York is steady enough that I can admit we’d recently hit a rough patch.  I’d spent so much time away last year that it felt like I was living consecutive winters. It wore me down and I took it out on the city that had become all work. Now that we’re having this beautiful summer, every day comes closer to New York’s song-and-dance ideal and I’m in love again. I even gave in and bought a new bicycle -albeit one that is technically older than I am – a copper colored Schwinn Suburban step-through with an honeywood basket. It’s heavy, impractical and my favorite thing in the world right now. Read more

The Cuban Table

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I always had a hard time dropping my pencil and turning in my work as a little girl and it’s not much different now. It has been almost two years since I first posted about The Cuban Table, my collaboration with food photographer Ellen Silverman, but I could have happily kept tweaking and polishing it forever. Luckily it wasn’t up to me which is why I have this lovely cover to share, an actual ink and paper bound book on its way, and an official release date from St. Martin’s Press to look forward to this October! Read more

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